Pond Apple

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Annona glabra

Description

This is a semi-deciduous perennial tree that usually grows between 3 and 6 metres tall, but can reach up to 15 metres.

Leaves vary from light to dark green but may go yellow in the dry season. They are 7 to 12 centimetres long with a prominent midrib. Leaves are arranged on alternate areas of the stem. When crushed, leaves emit a smell.

Flowers are creamy-white opening from a three-angled bud, with the 3 outer petals marked with a bright red spot on the inner surface near the base. Flowers are shortlived and 2 to 3 centimetres wide. It flowers during summer.

Fruit are 5 to 15 centimetres wide, green, apple shaped with stringy orange flesh and a large number of pumpkin-like seeds.

Habitat it is found in wetlands, swamps, mangroves, drainage lines, coastal dunes, Melaleuca woodlands, creeks and rivers.

Weed characteristics form dense thickets that prevent the regeneration of natural plants. It is capable of replacing whole ecosystems.

Dispersal down waterways, as seeds float and can survive long periods of immersion, enabling the plant to spread over very long distances.

Declaration Details

This species is a Class 2 declared plant under Queensland legislation and is listed as a Weed of National Significance.

How to act

Basal barking is an option if the plant is growing on dry soil. However, as most grow in water, the best option is to cut stump the tree using a water friendly herbicide. If growing in dry conditions a foliar treatment may be possible.

Refer to Weed Control Methods.

References

Related information

Pond Apple © NQ Dry Tropics 2011
Pond Apple © NQ Dry Tropics 2011
Pond Apple © NQ Dry Tropics 2011

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